For those of you unfortunate enough to have missed out on SDCC, check out this write-up Bleeding Cool did on my panel with Comixology– almost as good as being there in person! 
  http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/07/22/creating-comics-the-comixology-way/  
 
 Creating Comics the ComiXology Way 
 
 
 
  Chris D’Lando writes for Bleeding Cool:  
 When  Max Gaines  decided to package newspaper comic strips into the modern comic book, he fundamentally changed the way the medium could be used to tell stories. Though splash pages have gotten splashier, the comics medium hasn’t really changed much since the 1930′s.  ComiXology  is looking to change that with their Guided View technology. 
     
 For those who’ve never read a digital comic,  Guided View  allows readers to read comics on a panel-by-panel basis. ComiXology co-founder  John D. Roberts  and  Power Play  creator  Reilly Brown  spent some time talking about how creators can use Guided View to tell stories in new and interesting ways. 
 Have you ever spoiled a comic because your eye was drawn to an image on the right page before you read the left? Not with Guided View. 
 “Every reveal is a true reveal,” said Roberts. 
 Guided View storytelling can essentially be broken down into three techniques. Panning the “camera” around the page, zooming in and out of panels for a more cinematic effect, and the cross-fade which can be used to shift focus or overlay new information over panels. 
 Whether it’s  Marvel’s Infinite Comics ,  DC Squared , or Reilly Brown’s own Power Play, the technology is being used to tell more immersive and cinematic stories. 
 Reilly shared some of his tips and tricks for creating his pages – from cutting an 11×17 comic page in half to using Guided View to provide a different experience. Having word balloons fade in an out gives writers an opportunity to tell more story per page, for example. 
 So what’s coming for Guided View? Roberts says that the technology is constantly evolving. He’d love to use it to create some kind of  Choose Your Own Adventure  stories. He also says they’re considering incorporating ambient animation for falling snow, flickering televisions, etc. 
 ComiXology currently handles the Guided View editing themselves, but Roberts says they have plans to make the tools available for creators using the ComiXology Submit platform. 

 
 And if you haven’t checked it out yet,  here’s Power Play #4 , so you can see Guided View’s storytelling techniques in action!

For those of you unfortunate enough to have missed out on SDCC, check out this write-up Bleeding Cool did on my panel with Comixology– almost as good as being there in person!

http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/07/22/creating-comics-the-comixology-way/

Creating Comics the ComiXology Way

Chris D’Lando writes for Bleeding Cool:

When Max Gaines decided to package newspaper comic strips into the modern comic book, he fundamentally changed the way the medium could be used to tell stories. Though splash pages have gotten splashier, the comics medium hasn’t really changed much since the 1930′s. ComiXology is looking to change that with their Guided View technology.

comixology

For those who’ve never read a digital comic, Guided View allows readers to read comics on a panel-by-panel basis. ComiXology co-founder John D. Roberts and Power Play creator Reilly Brown spent some time talking about how creators can use Guided View to tell stories in new and interesting ways.

Have you ever spoiled a comic because your eye was drawn to an image on the right page before you read the left? Not with Guided View.

“Every reveal is a true reveal,” said Roberts.

Guided View storytelling can essentially be broken down into three techniques. Panning the “camera” around the page, zooming in and out of panels for a more cinematic effect, and the cross-fade which can be used to shift focus or overlay new information over panels.

Whether it’s Marvel’s Infinite Comics, DC Squared, or Reilly Brown’s own Power Play, the technology is being used to tell more immersive and cinematic stories.

Reilly shared some of his tips and tricks for creating his pages – from cutting an 11×17 comic page in half to using Guided View to provide a different experience. Having word balloons fade in an out gives writers an opportunity to tell more story per page, for example.

So what’s coming for Guided View? Roberts says that the technology is constantly evolving. He’d love to use it to create some kind of Choose Your Own Adventure stories. He also says they’re considering incorporating ambient animation for falling snow, flickering televisions, etc.

ComiXology currently handles the Guided View editing themselves, but Roberts says they have plans to make the tools available for creators using the ComiXology Submit platform.

And if you haven’t checked it out yet, here’s Power Play #4, so you can see Guided View’s storytelling techniques in action!

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