An interview with Reilly Brown: “I think our Lobo comic is an example of how to do a new version of the character right” Juan Pablo Armstrong: At what age you decided to become a comic artist? Reilly Brown: Very Young! I’d always wanted to be some form of artist, and comics in particular have always interested me. As a kid I used to make comic strips about funny animals, especially a lot of porcupines accidentally popping their word balloons. When I turned 11 and started getting into superheroes, I started making more action-packed comics. JPA: Was it difficult for you to break into the industry? Where did you made your big debut? RB: Breaking into the comic industry is always an exercise in frustration! Sending samples into publishers, not knowing if anyone’s looking at them, traveling to conventions and waiting in long lines for portfolio reviews, just to hear an editor say that they’re not interested… It’s tough! You have to be willing to put up with a lot of punishment. Or at least, that’s how it seems. The real punishment doesn’t actually start until you start getting work!I got my first break in the Marvel Holiday Special 2005. That was a fun one because it involved so many characters. A lot of them, like She-Hulk and Yellowjacket, I don’t think I’ve drawn since! JPA: Who or what are your biggest influences? RB: I’m influenced by so many things it’s hard to know where to start. Growing up, Jim Lee‘s X-Men was a huge influence on me. I could not get enough of them! A lot of video game art as well, particularly Street Fighter. Read the whole interview here.

An interview with Reilly Brown: “I think our Lobo comic is an example of how to do a new version of the character right”


Juan Pablo Armstrong: At what age you decided to become a comic artist?

Reilly Brown: Very Young! I’d always wanted to be some form of artist, and comics in particular have always interested me. As a kid I used to make comic strips about funny animals, especially a lot of porcupines accidentally popping their word balloons. When I turned 11 and started getting into superheroes, I started making more action-packed comics.

JPA: Was it difficult for you to break into the industry? Where did you made your big debut?

RB: Breaking into the comic industry is always an exercise in frustration! Sending samples into publishers, not knowing if anyone’s looking at them, traveling to conventions and waiting in long lines for portfolio reviews, just to hear an editor say that they’re not interested… It’s tough! You have to be willing to put up with a lot of punishment. Or at least, that’s how it seems. The real punishment doesn’t actually start until you start getting work!I got my first break in the Marvel Holiday Special 2005. That was a fun one because it involved so many characters. A lot of them, like She-Hulk and Yellowjacket, I don’t think I’ve drawn since!

JPA: Who or what are your biggest influences?

RB: I’m influenced by so many things it’s hard to know where to start. Growing up, Jim Lee‘s X-Men was a huge influence on me. I could not get enough of them! A lot of video game art as well, particularly Street Fighter.

Read the whole interview here.

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